Trump’s impeachment: Republicans circle the wagons

 

Trump’s impeachment: Republicans circle the wagons

The much-anticipated “Republican civil war is over before it even began”,  After the 6 January Capitol riot, it seemed possible that Senate Republicans might actually join Democrats in voting to convict Donald Trump of “incitement of insurrection” at his impeachment trial, which begins next week. Even loyalists expressed their disgust with the outgoing president. But after the damage was cleared up, Trump’s grip on the GOP was soon re-established. State Republican parties rushed to censure the ten House Republicans who voted to impeach – its Oregon wing even claimed the Capitol riot was a “false flag” operation by “leftist forces”. In the Senate last week, 45 of the 50 GOP senators voted to dismiss the charges against Trump, on the basis that he’d already left office.

The Republicans have good reasons for not wanting to pursue Trump’s conviction, They’re “terrified” that supporting it will turn the base against them and, frankly, they’ve got better things to do. Now Trump is out of office and no longer even “rage-tweeting”, impeachment seems “like a solution to a problem that already resolved itself”. The sad reality is that the party no longer recognises the line between “what is and isn’t acceptable”,That’s how it ended up with a “dangerous loon” like Marjorie Taylor Greene as one of its Congress members. Before her election last year, she was already known for spreading crazy QAnon conspiracy theories about an elite of Satan-worshipping paedophiles. It has now emerged that Greene also endorsed a social media post in 2019 that suggested getting rid of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi with “a bullet to the head”.

Greene isn’t representative of most Republicans, said Nicholas Kristof in The New York Times, but her presence is a bad sign. The GOP needs to escape the “malign influence” of the “charlatans” who peddle paranoia. America would benefit from a responsible party that stood up for conservative values and challenged liberal assumptions. “Half a century ago we didn’t need the racist George Wallace wing of the Democratic Party, and today we don’t need the wing of the Republican Party that embraces conspiracy theories and winks at violence.” The big question is: “Without that wing of today’s GOP, what’s left?”

Comments